NEWSLETTER

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  • Human versus gorilla DNA – size does matter!

    30/09/2018
    Posted by:

    Merogenomics


    There are two types of technologies used to sequence genomes, any genomes. The most common one takes the genome that is cut up into millions of short fragments, and it is these short bits of your genome that are all being decoded by the instrument all at the same time. Computers then put all of these fragments back together to assemble your genome by comparing with an existing reference of what a human genome looks like. Basically imagine if you shredded a book in one of those office shredding machines, and afterwards you had to put it back together. Except that for a human genome, you wouldn’t be shredding one book, you would be shredding a whole bunch of bookshelves worth of books, and then putting it back together. On the other side of the spectrum is a long read DNA sequencing technology. As its name implies, it is a technology that can decode long stretches of DNA at a time. In this case the equivalent would be to try to put the book together with entire pages intact, as opposed to everything being shredded.


  • Genome DNA testing in healthy people – what can you find?

    01/09/2018
    Posted by:

    Merogenomics


    Very little scientific data has come out to assess the utility of genome sequencing in healthy people. While thousands upon thousands of papers have been published on the use of DNA tests in helping to diagnose conditions in order to help manage existing health problems in the population, very little attention has been paid to healthy people sequencing their genomes, despite the fact that thousands of people have already done so.


  • Epizyme company in search of the first ever epigenetic cancer therapy

    28/06/2018
    Posted by:

    Merogenomics


    Tazemetostat is a drug for patients with specific genetically-defined tumors. This is how the future of both clinical trials and personalized targeted therapy is going to be defined. Well, perhaps more accurately, that future had arrived a long time ago, it is just that unfortunately not many oncologists are yet aware of or know how to apply such medications. But everything requires its time to mature, and eventually all of our oncologists will be sequencing patient cancer DNA without a second thought.


  • Clinical trials basics for patients

    27/01/2018
    Posted by:

    Merogenomics


    While clinical trials can conjure up a sense of fear and anxiety, it is more like a white-glove treatment experience for the participants that future users of the same treatment - once it is available on the market - will never experience.

    In many instances, these experimental drug treatments might be the only avenue for some people to be able to battle the disease, or ever gain access to such advanced methods of treatment. Due to the rigorousness of the research process, all of the different phases of clinical trials where different groups of participants are treated can last more than 10 years alone, and sometimes regulatory hurdles can delay the public availability of such ground-breaking treatments even further. Thus, patients in a clinical trial can gain access to very important medication much earlier than they otherwise could have.


  • Understand your genome

    06/12/2017
    Posted by:

    Merogenomics


    The day had arrived when I was going to see my doctor to receive my own genome sequence data and interpretation. I won't deny that I felt little bit nervous! I thought today could be a day in which I find out that I have an incurable disease, or a predisposition to cancer. Am I ready to face such truths? I have grappled with that question before, and it took me a very long time to decide what kind of information I wanted to receive from my genome sequence. Do I want to find out about having mutations predisposing me to diseases for which there are no cures? Like Huntington disease, or Parkinson's? In the end I decided yes. And there were good arguments for it.


  • Molecular look inside cancer to help a friend in need

    29/08/2017
    Posted by:

    Merogenomics


    Cancer. That dreaded word. No one ever wants to hear it. We all know how deadly cancer can be. So when I found out that a friend of mine was diagnosed with a recurrent form of epithelioid sarcoma, my heart sank. Because I know this woman, and I really like her; she has a kind heart, and is always sporting great smile. I felt so helpless. But I study the use of next-generation sequencing all the time and I already knew that the use of genome sequencing has had a valuable impact in the molecular understanding of different cancer types, including selecting the proper treatment type. I did not hesitate for a moment and I let my friend know what I knew, what I believed.